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Aperture Pour (Pot Melt) (Intermediate)
Tutorial:  Pot Melt: 
2005 Circular from Glass Graftsman magazine. Overview The basic process is very simple: fill the pot (crucible) with compatible glass and then position it in a kiln so that when the glass melts it will stream out of the hole in the bottom of the pot and land on a well-prepared kiln shelf.Heat the glass to about 1650F (880C),let gravity work,then anneal and cool the resulting disk of glass. Pot Melts can be done in any size kiln. Article goes on to fully explain how to set up for Pot Melts, a...


Aperture Pour 2 (Pot Melt) (Intermediate)
Tutorial:  Pot Melt: 
This is a look at advanced aperture (pot melt) pour techniques and it explores the ways to take the technique a few steps further by changing the appearance of the melted glass disk that results from a aperture (pot melt) pour by manipulating the flow of the glass as it leaves the pot. This can be done by changing or introducing just a few factors, which will be discussed in this article. Article is from Glass Craftsman (www.glasscraftsman.com)...


Steve Immerman Pot Melts (Intermediate)
Tutorial:  Pot Melt: 
An aperture pour (or pot melt, pot drop, or shelf melt) is a method to create an organic, swirly, interesting mixture of glasses using a kiln. The basic idea is to fill a flower pot with a mixture of glasses, and heat it very hot so that the molten glass has a low enough viscosity to pour through the hole (or aperture) in the bottom of the pot. The glass can be allowed to flow onto a prepared shelf, into a mold, or into an enclosure of some kind. The pot can have a single hole, a rec...


Colour Bar Tutorial for Fusing and Casting Glass (Intermediate)
Tutorial:  Glass Fusing:  Pot Melt:  Glass Pattern Bar:  Glass Colour Bar: 
#1. Stringer glass and sliced strips of glass are chosen for the colour palette. #2. I have chosen to use Zircar Refractory comp. containment molds for my dams or walls of the cast pieces I will create. I kiln wash with Bullseye kiln wash and dry before placing on a clean newly primed kiln shelf that has also been dried in kiln. #3. Here the molds are placed side by side ready to load with glass #4. Cut the strips of glass in any colour configuration of your choosing. I like to pile c...


Log of Pot Melts (Beginner)
Tutorial:  Pot Melt: 
Firing schedule and log of Pot Melts. Pot Melts are ostensibly a way to use up scrap glass: pile the glass into a flower pot or bowl with one or more holes, bring the kiln temp to 1700 F. and let the molten glass drizzle through the hole(s) forming a unique piece of art glass. Below is my log of my pot melt experiments. While most artist use more opaque glass, I've been working with trying to increase the transparency of of each piece. Most of my pieces are melted into either 12 or 15 inch s...


Pot Melt Tutorial (Beginner)
Tutorial:  Pot Melt: 
Text only tutorial. Each pot produces a different pattern and marbling affect based on the size, shape and number of holes and how they organized on the bottom. Keep in mind when arranging the glass pieces that the glass will flow slower from smaller holes or faster from larger. If you want more detail in the pour, elevate the pot with additional kiln furniture. Each pot melt is a unique piece of art that is impossible to duplicate. Finished pieces can be used as is, slumped into your fa...


Pot Melt Tutorial (Beginner)
Tutorial:  Pot Melt: 
Pot melts can be done in a few ways………. One way is to support the pot over a heavily kiln washed shelf with stilts. I use regular kiln stilts with a slice of kiln shelf across them. (An old broken kiln shelf will slice easily with a wet tile saw.) Fill the pot with scrap glass and fire up the kiln. Another way to do a melt is to drop the glass into a prepared stainless steel ring. There is always a little glass left in the pot after firing and those colors will drip into the next melt. Be s...


Wire Mesh Melt Tutorial (Intermediate)
Tutorial:  Pot Melt: 
This is a method, similar to the one I describe in my aperture pour tutorial, for creating mixtures of molten glass. The ultimate difference between a mesh melt and an aperture pour is the patterns that one can create. Otherwise, they are similar processes. A basket of wire mesh is created and supported by kiln furniture. Sheets of glass are arranged on top of the wire mesh. Wire rabbit fencing or "hardware cloth" works well. Supposedly, it should not be galvanized - or the zinc in t...


Master Class 6: Kiln Formed Glass with Rudi Gritsch (Intermediate)
Pot Melt:  Glass Pattern Bar:  Kiln Formed Glass:  Glass Colour Bar:  Wire Melt: 
Master Class 6: Kiln Formed Glass with Rudi Gritsch Rudy Gritsch, the Austrian kiln forming artist and instructor takes viewers through many of his processes involving the kiln. We follow Gritsch as he takes his work from the initial phases of design through the detailed setups, firings, and finishing processes, to completed works of art. ...


How to Set Up a Pot Melt (All)
Tutorial:  Pot Melt: 
How to Set Up a Pot Melt Tutorial by Delphi Glass using their brand of pots. ...


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